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Detourist

David

"

Many of us cannot help looking because of what Susan Sontag has called “the perennial seductiveness of war.” It is a kind of rubbernecking, staring at the bloody aftermath of something that is not an act of God but of man. The effect, as Ms. Sontag pointed out in an essay in The New Yorker in 2002, is anything but certain.

“Making suffering loom larger, by globalizing it, may spur people to feel they ought to ‘care’ more,” she wrote. “It also invites them to feel that the sufferings and misfortunes are too vast, too irrevocable, too epic to be much changed by any local, political intervention.”

So now that war comes to us in real time, do we feel helpless or empowered? Do we care more, or will the ubiquity of images and information desensitize us to the point where human suffering loses meaning when it is part of a scroll that includes a video of your niece twerking? Oh, we say as our index finger navigates to the next item, another one of those.

As war becomes a more remote, mechanized activity, posts and images from the target area have significant value. When a trigger gets pulled or bombs explode, real people are often on the wrong end of it. And bearing witness to the consequences gives meaning to what we see.

"
fotojournalismus:

Palestinian girls play on the first day of Eid al-Fitr in a United Nations school where dozens of families have sought refuge after fleeing their homes in fear of Israeli airstrikes, in Jabaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

fotojournalismus:

Palestinian girls play on the first day of Eid al-Fitr in a United Nations school where dozens of families have sought refuge after fleeing their homes in fear of Israeli airstrikes, in Jabaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

beautifulmars:

Choose Your Hiking Trail

(Source: uahirise.org)

dionyssos:

David Milne : Boats docked at a wharf

dionyssos:

David Milne : Boats docked at a wharf

(via jesuisperdu)

"Many women, I think, resist feminism because it is an agony to be fully conscious of the brutal misogyny which permeates culture, society, and all personal relationships. It is as if our oppression were cast in lava eons ago and now it is granite, and each individual woman is buried inside the stone. Women try to survive inside the stone, buried in it. Women say, I like this stone, its weight is not too heavy for me. Women defend the stone by saying that it protects them from rain and wind and fire. Women say, all I have ever known is this stone, what is there without it?"

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.

(via mindelanowl)

newshour:

These people don’t know each other. And they’re not models or actors.

They’re strangers, brought together for the “Touching Strangers” project — a photo experiment from Richard Renaldi, who’s traveled around the country and asked strangers to touch each other with the familiarity of a friend or family member.

See more photos.

nevver:

How is your day going? Isaac Cordal

(via nevver)

Tatiana tears up as a fan thanks Tatiana and the show for giving her the courage to come out and for writing Cosima as a character who is more than her sexuality. (x)

(Source: thecloneclub, via mindelanowl)

museumuesum:

Sarah Charlesworth

Thomas Brooks Simmons, Bunker Hill Towers, Los Angeles, 1980
Black and white mural print, 42” x 78”


In 1980 Sarah Charlesworth searched the archives of wire services and tabloid newspapers for pictures of falling figures. From a selection of seventy she rephoto-graphed seven of the grainy images and enlarged them to human scale; her subjects are transformed into semi-abstract shapes hovering in front of the grids of blurry windows. Each of Charlesworth’s Stills (as the series was called) is unique and entitled with only the name of the subject, the building from which he or she fell, and the city; like tombstones, they declare only the facts, but not the manner, of the death. The most obvious precedent for the Stills are Andy Warhol’s paintings of suicide jumpers from two decades earlier, which famously literalized the numbing effect of incessant exposure to traumatic events as experienced through the mass media. Charlesworth’s works, on the other hand, are individual encounters with the mysteries of fate: it is not surprising to learn that her actual inspiration was Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927), which chronicles a priest’s search for meaning after witnessing the collapse of an ancient footbridge and the resulting deaths of five people.

museumuesum:

Sarah Charlesworth

Thomas Brooks Simmons, Bunker Hill Towers, Los Angeles, 1980

Black and white mural print, 42” x 78”

In 1980 Sarah Charlesworth searched the archives of wire services and tabloid newspapers for pictures of falling figures. From a selection of seventy she rephoto-graphed seven of the grainy images and enlarged them to human scale; her subjects are transformed into semi-abstract shapes hovering in front of the grids of blurry windows. Each of Charlesworth’s Stills (as the series was called) is unique and entitled with only the name of the subject, the building from which he or she fell, and the city; like tombstones, they declare only the facts, but not the manner, of the death. The most obvious precedent for the Stills are Andy Warhol’s paintings of suicide jumpers from two decades earlier, which famously literalized the numbing effect of incessant exposure to traumatic events as experienced through the mass media. Charlesworth’s works, on the other hand, are individual encounters with the mysteries of fate: it is not surprising to learn that her actual inspiration was Thornton Wilder’s The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927), which chronicles a priest’s search for meaning after witnessing the collapse of an ancient footbridge and the resulting deaths of five people.

"Redemption is something you have to fight for in a very personal, down-dirty way. Some of our characters lose that, some stray from that, and some regain it."
- Joss Whedon (via ryanpanos)